Author Archives: fantesinferno

Cloak and Dagger #1 (Marvel Comics, October 1983)

In this episode we’ll take a look back at Cloak and Dagger #1 that hit the spinner racks on July 12, 1983.

Cloak and Dagger #1 can be found in Cloak and Dagger: Child of Darkness, Child of Light on Amazon and ComiXology.  As an Amazon affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.  Thank you for your support!

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Movies for Memorial Day 2020

With Memorial Day coming up on Monday May 25th, I would like to thank all veterans and active members of the armed forces for their service and sacrifice.

I’ve always appreciated the combat film having grown up watching old black and white war films on Saturday afternoons. My favorite films of the genre are Peter Weir’s Gallipoli and Sam Fuller’s The Big Red One, but over the years Glory by Ed Zwick and Band of Brothers have made it on to my list of personal favorites.

Each Memorial Day Weekend I review the TV listings and streaming services and make a list of military themed films and documentaries that are available for free and subscription streaming and cable TV.  I make an effort to avoid the comedy and caper films that only use wars, major battles or military life as a backdrop.

Every year Turner Classic Movies has a strong lineup of films for Memorial Day Weekend.  While the streaming services seem a little lighter on the military and war themed feature films this year, military documentaries are well represented on Netflix, Amazon Prime and Tubi. Unfortunately one big disappointment this year is that Band of Brothers, The Pacific and Taking Chance are not available for free streaming on Amazon Prime.

Turner Classic Movies (all times listed are EST):

Friday, May 23rd
9:30 AM – Glory (1989)
11:45 AM – Sgt. York (1941)
4:00 PM – The Steel Helmet (1951)
5:30 PM – The Green Berets (1968)

Saturday, May 24th
12:00 PM – Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944)
12:30 AM – Wings (1927)

Monday, May 25th
5:00 PM – Battle of the Bulge (1965)
8:00 PM – The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)

Netflix
Hamburger Hill (1987)
Jarhead (2005)
Five Came Back (2019)
World War II in HD (2009)
Women at War 1914-1918 (2014)
Women at War 1939-1945 (2015)
Medal of Honor (2018)
USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage (2016)

Amazon Prime Video
Gallipoli (1981)
American Experience: The Great War (2017)
Journey’s End (2018)
The Great War (2019)
A Bridge Too Far (1977)
Sands of Iwo Jima (1950)
The Battle of Britain (1969)
Flying Tigers (1942)
The Bridge at Remagen (1969)
The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1955)
Pork Chop Hill (1959)
Heroes of the Forgotten War: The Heroes of Kapyong (2011)
Dick Winters: Hang Tough – Honoring Leadership on D-Day (2005)
Vietnam: The Battle of Khe Sanh: The Fires of Hell (2006)

Tubi
Go For Broke (1951)
The True Glory (1945)
Desert Victory (1943)
Navajo Code Talkers of World War II (2018)
The Way Ahead (1945)

Pluto
Gallipoli (1981)

Crackle
Bat 21 (1988)

Tubi, Crackle and Pluto are free apps, Netflix and Amazon Prime require subscriptions. Check these links for information on free trials of Amazon Prime and Amazon Prime Video. As a member of the Amazon affiliate program, I may receive commissions for qualified purchases at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

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Jon Sable Freelance #1 (First Comics, June 1983)

In this episode we’ll take a look back at Mike Grell’s Jon Sable Freelance #1 that hit the spinner racks on February 19, 1983.

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Jon Sable Freelance #1 can be found in the Jon Sable Freelance Omnibus #1 on Amazon.  As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  Thank you for your support!

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Micronauts #1 (Marvel Comics, January 1979)

In this episode we’ll take a look back at the first issue of Marvel Comics Micronauts that hit the spinner racks on September 19, 1978.

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Fante’s Inferno On YouTube!

Fante’s Inferno now has a YouTube channel and my first video has published!

Episode 1 will post this week.  Please check it out and subscribe!

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Alien Legion #1 (1984)

Alien Legion 1 Cover

Alien Legion #1 (Epic Comics – April 1984) Copyright Carl Potts

When Marvel Comics launched its Epic Comics creator-owned line of titles in 1982, I had a tough time trying to decide which of the new titles would be included in my monthly comic book budget.  Jim Starlin’s Dreadstar and Steve Englehart’s Coyote were occasional purchases, but there was one Epic title that stood out the most for me starting with issue #1 and would be my top purchase with each new issue: 1984’s Alien Legion by the creative team of Carl Potts, Alan Zelenetz, Frank Cirocco and Terry Austin.

Frank Cirocco’s painted cover for Alien Legion #1 drew me in from the first moment I saw it on the spinner rack of my local comic shop. The $2.00 cover price was a bit steep for me back then considering the going rate for most Marvel and DC titles on my purchase list was $.60. But at 48 pages on higher quality paper (I wish today’s comics were printed on Baxter paper!), it was worth sacrificing the two additional titles I could have bought. Though a recent look back at my purchases shows I still had a decent comics haul that month.

The inside cover’s “state of the galaxy” does a great job setting up the first story by describing the roles of the governing body, the TOPHAN Galactic Union (TGU), and the Alien Legion, mercenaries comprised of different races from throughout the Union. The TGU is made up of elected officials from the Thermor, Ophides and Auron galaxies (hence TOPHAN) with established treaties, trade agreements and peacekeeping responsibilities throughout the galaxy. The Alien Legion are the grunts sent in for the dirty work. Page one of issue #1 sums them up best: “Footsloggers and soldiers of fortune, priests and poets, killers and cads – they fight for a future Galarchy, for cash, a cause, for the thrill of adventure. Legionnaires live rough and they die hard, tough as tungsten and loyal to the dirty end.” How could I not buy this issue off the rack?

The “dossiers” of six of the main legionnaires give each of their backgrounds: Torie Montroc, the human university graduate forced to join by his wealthy father in order to earn a trust fund; Sarigar, the serpentine alien leader of the unit featured in the title; Jugger Grimrod, the anti-social weapons expert; Durge, the former wrestler known for his bravery; Meico, the kind-hearted former refugee; and Torqa Dun, the former bureaucrat who’s in it for the money more than the honor of service.

Alien Legion 1

Alien Legion #1 (Epic Comics April 1984) – Copyright Carl Potts

The story begins in space when a Legion ship, en route to disrupt an illegal mining operation on the nearby moon Wedifact IV, is sneak attacked by a squadron of enemy Harkilons. The Legion ship, badly damaged, fights back just long enough for two shuttles (Vector and Nomad) to escape to their destination. But despite the destruction of the main ship and the loss of half of their colleagues, the surviving 28 legionnaires still have a job to do.

Lieutenant Montroc, piloting Nomad, and Vector’s Lieutenant Birkh confirm their orders from Captain Sarigar: observe the operation from the air, then rendezvous with Captains Sarigar and Phyte to plan further action. Birkh’s team spots the illegal mining operation, but what looks to be a routine plan is thrown off when the mine’s defense battery knocks out Vector shuttle, crash landing it to the surface.

Before Birkh’s team can even assess their surroundings, they’re ambushed by rogue miners led by Prinn, who waste no time shooting to kill. Birkh curses the fact the legionnaires can’t properly fight back as their regulation weapons were replaced by eco-friendly dart guns in order not to environmentally impact the planet. Prinn, hardly sympathetic to the ecological impact of his mining operation, kills Birkh. The 28 are now down to 14.

Alien Legion 2

Alien Legion #1 (Epic Comics April 1984) – Copyright Carl Potts

Back at Tophan Galactic Union headquarters, Legion representatives are given little support by the committee members, who are more concerned with the ecological preservation of Wedifact IV and its species of rathosaurs over the military implications of the Harkilon empire breaking an already fragile peace. The representatives, ambivalent to the military in general, simply want the legionnaires to fulfill their mission of knocking out the pirate mining outpost with as little environmental consequences as possible, regardless of the Legion’s losses.

Back on Wedifact IV Montroc leads his seven man squad through the jungle and finds Birkh’s team dead in a clearing. As the remaining legionnaires bury and collect the dogtags of the fallen, Badj sneaks off on his own to observe the rathosaurs. Only they are not living uninterrupted in their natural habitat, they’ve been trained by the pirates to do their manual labor.  Montroc’s job isn’t made any easier by infighting among the men, but a crack of Sarigar’s serpentine tail quickly restores order.

The remaining legionnaires move in on Prinn’s mining operation with a nighttime raid. The idealistic Montroc asks Sarigar if it’s worth the risk, but Sarigar quickly reminds him that as legionnaires it’s about following the orders. When their stealth attempt to breach the mine fails, it’s the legionnaires versus the entire camp. With the odds against them and nothing more than dart guns, the legionnaires ignore their disadvantage and give it everything they’ve got. Prinn uses his lackeys to save his own skin, which leads to a surprise reveal.

No spoilers here. Potts and Zelenetz crafted a fantastic story that does a great job introducing the major characters.  Penciller Frank Cirocco and inker Terry Austin complemented each other perfectly on their Alien Legion run.  Austin is one of a handful of inkers who’s lines worked amazingly with many pencillers: Howard Chaykin, Paul Smith and of course, John Byrne to name a few.  But his all too brief work with Frank Cirocco on the pages of Alien Legion is my favorite of his penciller/inker collaborations.  I’m the proud owner of three original Terry Austin inked pages, but it’s my Cirocco/Austin page from Alien Legion #4 that is my favorite of my original comic art collection.  The crisp lines make me wish they worked on more Alien Legion issues and a broader range of stories together.

After reading Alien Legion #1, it was a tough wait until the next issue.  But great writing, great characters, and top notch art always made subsequent issues worth the wait.  Even thirty five years later, these footsloggers are well worth revisiting.  Long live the Legion!

Alien Legion #1 can be found in the Alien Legion Omnibus Volume 1 on Amazon and Comixology.  As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  Thank you for your support!

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Southern Comfort (1981)

Release Date: September 25, 1981
Starring: Keith Carradine, Powers Boothe, Fred Ward, T.K. Carter, Franklyn Seales, Lewis Smith, Alan Autry (credited as Carlos Brown), Les Lannom, Brion James, Peter Coyote
Written by: Michael Kane, Walter Hill, David Giler
Directed by: Walter Hill

I love rediscovering an obscure film from the 80’s that still hits on all cylinders decades later.  When my family first got cable TV in 1981 it gave me exposure to quality (and some not so quality) films that I normally would not have been introduced to at our local cinemas.  Southern Comfort, directed by Walter Hill, is one of those great films that was easy to find on cable TV back then but became harder to find over the years.  With the film’s recent availability on Amazon Prime, it was time to revisit it.

Walter Hill is best known for The Warriors and 48 Hours, but his impressive list of films includes hard hitting dramas (Hard Times, The Driver), a beloved comedy (Brewster’s Millions), an action film (Red Heat) and less conventional dramas like the neo-noir Streets of Fire and blues themed Faustian tale Crossroads.  But the 1981 drama/thriller Southern Comfort is a solid film that inexplicably slipped through the cracks over time despite an engaging story and great cast.

The film begins in 1973 Louisiana.  Army National Guardsmen are on maneuvers in the bayou.  Captain Poole (played by Peter Coyote) assembles a squad of eight men for a standard recon mission.  Their morale is apathetic at best and it doesn’t get any better with arrival of Hardin (played by Powers Boothe), a transfer from Texas who wants to put in his time and get home to his wife.  Stuckey (played by Lewis Smith) tries to lighten the mood by firing blank rounds from his machine gun at Poole’s second-in-command Sergeant Casper (played by Les Lannom), which shows the amount of respect they have for him (and also makes a viewer wonder why the surrounding troops didn’t respond to it as a threat – my one caveat with the film).  Spencer (Keith Carradine) boosts the men’s motivation when he tells them he has hired several prostitutes to wait for them at a rendezvous point at the end of their recon mission.

Several hours into the recon mission Captain Poole realizes their course has been blocked by a river that rose with the winter rains.  Their choice is to continue forward to find their rendezvous point or backtrack to base and start the recon all over again.  At a trapping post, faced with a river they are unable to cross and the entertainment waiting for them at their eventual rendezvous point, they “requisition” three canoes from local trappers who aren’t around to give permission.  At the suggestion of straight laced high school coach Bowden (played by Alan Autry but credited as Carlos Brown), the squad leaves one canoe behind with a note explaining where they will find the other canoes.  But despite the soldiers’ best intentions the trappers are not happy with a group of outsiders interfering with their property.

The group is halfway across the river when the French speaking Cajun trappers angrily make their presence known.  Reece (played by Fred Ward) manages to get a few rude words out in French.  Poole attempts to explain they’ll get their canoes back, but the situation spirals out of control when joker Stuckey fires a couple of dozen blank rounds at them.  The trappers, unaware they are blanks, return fire and shoot Poole in the head, killing him.  Leaderless and lost, the guardsmen now need to survive in unfamiliar territory without live ammunition.

Fear and infighting within the group set in.  Spencer reveals that Reese has his own box of live ammunition.  Casper orders him to turn it over to distribute among the squad but Reese is more than willing to give Casper a bullet to the head to keep his stash.  Hardin sneaks up behind Reese with a knife to his throat and the bullets are turned over.  Casper does his best to keep order and lead the squad, but despite his experience and knowledge of military procedure, he’s unable to command the respect of the men.

The next day they find the trappers cabin and capture the only inhabitant, a one-armed trapper (Brion James).  But the group has different ideas as to how their new prisoner should be treated.  After Simms (played by Franklyn Seales) cracks him across the jaw he’s unwilling to talk.  Bowden’s composure erodes and he’s hellbent on payback.  Oblivious to the supplies they could have collected, he sets the trapper’s cabin on fire and nearly kills all of them when a storage of dynamite goes off.  With even less live ammunition they continue through the bayou dragging both a prisoner and Poole’s lifeless body.  They can’t find the highway and they take it as a morbid sign when they encounter eight dead rabbits (one for each of them) hanging in their path.

Without a compass, Spencer and Casper disagree over which direction to go.  As they attempt to get their bearings, a group of hunting dogs attack them with Stuckey and Cribbs (played by T.K. Carter) getting the worst of it.  The squad is now the hunted, descending into fear, despair and paranoia with each deadly trap they encounter.  When they’re not feeling the presence of their hunters, the squad begins to turn on itself.  Bowden cracks and is tied up so as not to become a danger to himself and the squad.  Reese tries his own methods of interrogation on their prisoner which leads to a knife-wielding showdown with Hardin.  With no end to their ordeal in sight, Casper’s quoting of the manual finally turns the men against him and they follow Spencer.

No spoilers here.  Walter Hill’s direction and cinematographer Andrew Laszlo’s photography of the bayou puts the audience right in the middle of the squad’s nightmare.  It’s the portrayal of the “local’s” desire to protect their land and way of life that effectively brings out the growing fear and desperation of the guardsmen (a few shots are not for the squeamish).  It’s too easy to compare Southern Comfort to the critically acclaimed Deliverance (unfortunately even the film’s poster is guilty of this), but Southern Comfort stands on its own as a powerful psychological drama that keeps the audience engaged to the very end.

Southern Comfort is available on DVD and Blu-Ray on Amazon.  As an Amazon Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.  Thank you for your support!

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Moon Knight #1 (1980)

Moon Knight #1 (November 1980) – Copyright Marvel Comics

One of my simple pleasures has always been reaching into the old box o’ comics to revisit the classic comic stories of my youth.  I was fortunate to live in an era when the classic Marvel runs of Daredevil, X-Men, Fantastic Four and Thor were in full swing, but waiting another month for the next issue was a combination of excitement and torture.  Even though I’m now able to buy the trades or even pull out several of my own back issues from a classic run, I have to admit that being able to reread three or four consecutive issues in one sitting is a little less satisfying to me.  And more than once I found myself reading one issue in a trade only to put it down and let a little time pass before reading the next issue in the book.

By 1980 we were several years into our comic book collecting.  Looking back at the early 80s it was great to buy eventual classic issues of Daredevil #181 and Thor #337 right off the rack.  But we were always envious of any comic book collectors that had a first issue of any Marvel title from the Silver Age, especially X-Men #1 which to this day is still my grail comic.

So when Moon Knight #1 hit the stands in 1980, we jumped at the opportunity to add a first issue to our collection.  Bill Sienkiewicz’s cover depicting Moon Knight’s white costume popped on the spinner rack, as did “Premiere Issue!” and the “1” in that beautiful corner box.  That sealed the deal and this issue quickly became a favorite in our collection.  But that cherished #1 did not lead to more careful treatment, and like many other comics in our collection it can now be classified as “well read.”  The character of Moon Knight was created by writer Doug Moench and artist Don Perlin and debuted in Werewolf By Night #32 in 1975.  He’s made several appearances in other comic titles through the late 70’s before getting his own book, which officially delivered on August 19, 1980.  But it was Moench and Sienkiewicz’s Moon Knight #1 that was my personal introduction to the character and my favorite of all of Moon Knight’s volumes.

Moon Knight #1 (November 1980) – Copyright Marvel Comics

Moon Knight #1 begins with a splash page by Sienkiewicz that takes no prisoners.  A squad of mercenaries led by Bushman rides into a rebel camp in Sudan at dawn, shooting every rebel in sight.  Bushman’s second in command is Marc Spector, who disapproves of Bushman’s blood thirsty methods.  Helicopter pilot Frenchy drops in and lets Marc in on his feelings that working for Bushman may not be in their best interests.  Bushman plans an attack on Selina, a village that poses no threat but has a recently excavated pharaoh’s tomb for him to loot.  Marc and Frenchy make the decision to desert that night.

During the raid on Selina, an old archeologist attempts to kill Bushman, but is stopped by Marc.  Rather than taking the old man prisoner, Bushman kills him on sight.  With his dying breath, the archaeologist tells Marc to find and protect his daughter.  Despite her fear and anger towards the mercenaries, she heeds Marc’s threat and escapes.  Bushman witnesses Spector’s “indescretion” but lets it slide and orders Marc to collect the gold artifacts and round up the remaining men in the town square.  Frenchy arrives to helicopter Marc out, but Marc breaks away to unsuccessfully stop the firing squad from killing the prisoners.  Marc tries to kill Bushman but is knocked out and left to die a slow death in the desert.

He wakes up and barely musters the energy to wander through the desert for the next day and night.  The following night his near lifeless body is found by the locals.  They pull him in to the tomb of Pharaoh Seti as they and the slain archaeologist’s daughter Missy attempt to pack up the remaining artifacts.  Her initial anger gives way to mercy, as she refuses to give in to anger and hate.  Under the statue of Khonshu the moon god Marc’s body shoots back to life.  He inexplicably recognizes Khonshu as “the taker of vengeance” and takes the white cloak off the statue before taking off in a jeep for his revenge on Bushman.

Moon Knight #1 (November 1980) – Copyright Marvel Comics

Back at Selina, Marc takes out two of Bushman’s guards and sets a decoy to draw out Bushman and his men.  After knocking the men out with an ammo dump blast, it’s just Marc and Bushman.  Missy (her real name Marlene) shows up behind him, held back by a mysterious figure in the shadows.  Marc turns to help her only to find that it’s Frenchy keeping her at a safe distance.  Bushman escapes and Marc’s opportunity for revenge is lost.

Moon Knight #1 (November 1980) – Copyright Marvel Comics

Marc returns to New York with Frenchy and Marlene and establishes a new life in Long Island with two additional identities: Wall Street mogul Steven Grant and cab driver Jake Lockley.  But Marc’s triple personality in addition to Moon Knight begins to take a toll on Marlene.  “Lockley” tracks down Bushman to a club in Harlem, and once he’s in full Moon Knight costume, Frenchy rides in on their crescent shaped aircraft to drop him into Bushman’s club for a showdown.

No spoilers here.  Moon Knight #1 is a great read and sets the tone for a great run on the title by Moench and Sienkiewicz.  Moench’s script and Sienkiewicz’s dynamic art pack a lot of action and drama (with a higher than normal body count for a comic book of that era) into 24 pages.  You definitely got your money’s worth with the 50 cent cover price back then, just as you would if you paid $3.99 for the issue today.  Comixology is currently offering the digital version of Moon Knight #1.  It’s a great introduction to Moon Knight’s initial 80’s run that still holds up almost 40 years later.

Moon Knight #1 can be found in Moon Knight Epic Collection: Bad Moon Rising on Amazon and Comixology.  As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  Thank you for your support!

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